Book Printing Blog

How to Get a Bookstore to Stock Your Self-Published Book - Boston

Joseph Coupal - Monday, March 24, 2014

Bookstores everywhere are facing extraordinary pressures. The switch to ebooks is squeezing them, while in many places they are facing massive rises in rents and rates.

Books are rarely their most profitable item. More and more of their selling space is given over to cards and gifts on which they can make a profit. Inevitably, this means less space for books.

On the other hand, independent bookstores often put tremendous time and effort into author events and local literary festivals, promoting and supporting books and authors with genuine passion. Those books they do put on display are those that the staff really believe in – not just ones publishers have paid them to promote.

So before you walk into a bookshop with that newly self-published book, pause for a moment and see yourself through the eyes of the bookseller. You might think you are offering them the next bestseller. What they see is someone bidding for a piece of their scarcest commodity – their space to sell books.

How Bookstores View You and Your Book

The first thing they look at is the appearance of your book. It may be unfair, but research shows that the cover is the prime factor in people’s decision to buy a book. If you are self-publishing, know that if that cover isn’t striking, if the inside is sloppy and cheap-looking, why should the bookseller give it precious shelf space?

The second thing they’ll consider is you. The author. You’re asking for their support, but if you’re an unknown quantity when you walk through that door, why should they care about you?

Your relationship with the local bookshop should begin before you publish. In the intervening time, buy books from them, attend and write about events they run. When the time comes to launch the book, you can pitched it, or participate in events.

Don’t expect to walk into a bookshop as a complete stranger and ask them to stock your book. Be a customer first. If they organize events, attend them. Follow them on Twitter and like them on Facebook. Write about them on your blog or pitch an article about them to your local paper.

Get to know them and let them get to know you. It will pay off. For more information on self-publishing, contact The Country Press.

selfpublishingadvice.org


Short Run Book Printing to Save Money and Space – Newton, Boston

Joseph Coupal - Friday, March 14, 2014

There are many situations where a publisher or author only wants a limited number of books printed. When only a small amount of books are needed, to fulfill orders, for marketing, to handle back orders or for book signings or other marketing events, short run book printing is the avenue of choice.

Traditional publishing means thousands of copies of books will be printed. With traditional publishing, storage, initial cost and demand all come into play. For smaller budgets, smaller storage areas and for smaller demand, short run printing can meet your book printing needs.

New authors, smaller university courses, and often larger publishing houses cannot often afford to choose traditional publishing leading to thousands of copies of books. A short run book printer can help.

For a traditional publisher, the major cost is the setup cost when the printing plates are prepared. Generally, this is really the only cost associated with traditional printing, so if you have a large amount of books to be printed, the cost per book reduces with offset printing. However, if you need anywhere from 11-5000 books, the choice is short run book printing. While the cost per book is higher, the cost for the order is much less, because you can order fewer books.

Through short run book printing you can order a limited number of printed books. This is the better choice for many people and organizations, including churches, publishers, authors, universities and municipalities.

For more information on short run book printing, contact The Country Press.


Advanced Reader Copies and Short Run Printing is Important for Book Promotion – Newton, MA

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, March 04, 2014

There is all kinds of inspiration for getting published. However, there are a few things you should know about the business of self-publishing:

1. Your book will reflect your investment. You do need to spend some money on publishing, editing, and marketing your book; even if you are self-publishing. To publish a book to the same standards and quality of the big four publishing companies, you have to make an investment in the book. You don’t want it to scream ‘home-made’.

A customized book cover that is vetted with targeted readers is also part of publishing a successful book. Paying attention to the cover is extremely important to book sales and that self-published authors often "mess up" when it comes to a selecting a good book cover.

2. People who don't know you will need to buy your book. Your family and friends will definitely help promote your book. However, to approach the number of sales in order to get a return on your investment will require extending your book promotion beyond your personal Christmas card lists, Facebook friends, Twitter and Instagram followers. This means you need printed book copies for marketing and promotion: Short run book printing.

3. Book promotion is not for the fainthearted. With over 400,000 self-published titles a year, getting a self-published book noticed is a challenge. Book promotion requires traditional marketing, social media marketing, guerrilla marketing and more. An even greater challenge is that promotion must be done within a limited time frame. Providing advanced copy books to booksellers can be problematic for self-published titles. Booksellers, book reviewers, notable book bloggers, radio and newspapers require advance reader copies to promote a book. A successful book campaign begins six months prior to the book release and continues for at least another three to six months after the release. After six to nine months, the book is no longer new and it becomes very difficult to get it noticed among the over 35,000 new self-published titles released each month.

4. Getting your self-published book on a library or bookstore shelf. Remember bringing your written work to the public is a business. The majority of bookstores will not stock self-published books. It is a matter of dollars. Print on Demand book publishers do not offer the same deep discount on volume sales as traditional publishers; nor do they allow books to be returned. As a result, bookstore owners are reluctant to sell self-published titles. It is not because they are snobs. It is just good business. Stores do not have the space to keep large inventories, especially for books that are not selling. Returns are costly and inefficient.

5. Writing is a personal journey but publishing is not. A myth that most people unconsciously live by is the assumption that others are just as interested in your life as you are. Most writers unconsciously (and often consciously) believe that people will be interested in what they have written. As the saying goes, everyone has a story in them, which is why self-published memoirs are among the top self-published genres.

Book promotion requires a clearly defined target audience and a great marketing strategy. Everything about the book needs to be vetted with the target audience. Short run book printing is perfect for this step.

For more information on ARC's and short run printing, contact The Country Press.

Huffington Post


Small Publishing Houses Promise Hands On Support and Better Options – Middleboro, MA

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Things are pretty weird in the book publishing world these days — it’s a scenario not unlike what the major-label music industry has witnessed in the past decade. And, like musicians, authors are increasingly eschewing the big five publishing companies in favor of smaller book printing companies. Small publishing houses aren’t handing out million-dollar advances, but they do promise hands-on support and close working relationships between author and editor or publisher (who are often one and the same).

Small presses also offer diversity. Though most put out only a few titles a year, there are many boutique publishers to choose from, and they’re as varied as the authors they serve. “Gone are the days when The New York Times best-seller list provided readers all they needed to know about the best books to read,” says a press release from the Independent Publisher Book Awards. “More than a million books are being published each year, and many of the nation’s top authors are realizing that in a fast-changing marketplace, independent publishing offers the flexibility required to succeed,” says the release. A significant number of those books are coming out of small presses — some of which have been in business for decades, while others are just starting up.

For more information on small presses, contact The Country Press.

mountainx.com


Self-Publishing is Great for Fiction and Non-Fiction – Newton, MA

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Amy Shojai, award-winning author of 27 best-selling books. Here she explains why self-publishing is a good choice for writers of non-fiction.

Publishing has changed.

Today is the best time to be an author, particularly for non-fiction writers. Here are some top reasons.

Timing for Publication. Every author must polish, edit and best prepare their work to be professional quality. And while some fiction has timeliness factors, non-fiction more often demands specific scheduling for best effect. Tying a non-fiction book’s publication to a calendar event that is important to that work can impact marketability. With indie publishing, the author has control and can plan the book release and promotions for the ideal time. Anniversaries of historical events can be tied to non-fiction books on these subjects.

Updates/Revisions. Yes, any self published author can update book's digital file quickly to correct a typo or improve an edit. Non-fiction authors benefit even more from the ability to revise and release updated versions of informational and prescriptive works. These can be done easily and quickly, while books published traditionally cannot be revised until/unless a set number of sales demands a new edition. Having books with outdated information can hurt the non-fiction author’s reputation and platform, so self-publishing books on non-fiction has great advantages.

Platform and Reputation. Niche non-fiction sales have dropped or gone away entirely in traditional publishing. That makes sense, because the book must sell enough to “feed” the agent, the editor and the publishing house staff and expenses. For the self-published author who has the reputation, expertise and audience, niche non-fiction books sell steadily and well and can be a renewable resource. They also increase the author’s expertise, offer credentials for speaking engagements and endorsements, and can lead to many other opportunities. Non-fiction is much easier to market.

Pricing. All self-published authors have the ability to price books as they see fit, and change that price as needed. Non-fiction books can be priced higher than fiction, and generally sell better at a higher price point.

Control. This for me is the biggest advantage of all, and covers everything else. The non-fiction author knows what appeals to his or her audience, and has the ability to choose the cover of the book, timing of the release, pricing, revisions and more to best leverage the book’s launch.

For more information on self-publishing, contact The Country Press.

Selfpublishingadvice.org


Which Book Publishing Options is Best for You? Newton, MA

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, February 12, 2014

How do you know if self-publishing or traditional publishing is right for you and your book?

Now there are more opportunities and possibilities to write, share, and publish a story — and interact with an audience. Whether you are after the traditional publishing experience, complete with an agent, editor, and publisher, or want to self-publish a book, it's completely within your grasp. You decide what works best for you and your work.

If seeing your book in print is to fulfill a personal goal you have choose short run book printing or vanity publishing. Short run printing is best for self-publishers and publishers who may have only a small distribution channel because they can order anywhere from 11-5000 books and order more later if the book sells. The short run book printer will already have both the interior and cover materials of the publication. A short run book printer can make the world of difference to a self-publisher or publisher as being able to order a short run can mean the difference between printing and not printing their book.

A vanity publisher publishes any anyone's work provided they have the money to pay for their services. The manufacturer prints and binds a book but does not offer editing, marketing, or promotional assistance. However, the author owns the printed books and retains all profit from sales.

If you're writing a family history, memoir or book of poetry that has a limited audience, and don't want your book stocked at bookstores, using POD book printing is probably to your advantage. They are often nonreturnable, not sold at a discount, and you won't have to store any unsold books.

Printing in bulk via self-publishing may be your best bet if you have a visible platform established to reach your audience, both online and offline, have credibility with your readers in your genre/category and are prepared to dedicate your time to marketing and promoting your work.

Self-publishing requires the author to invest their own money to produce, market, distribute, and warehouse the book. While this can be a huge time commitment, the process can be more cost-effective than other forms of publishing.

Self-publishing is also a good option if you have a time-sensitive manuscript.

On the flip side, here are a few things to consider. If you don't know how to find or reach your readers, don't have an online presence, don't have the time to spend online or dislike social media, want to be in a brick-and-mortar type of bookstore and have a publisher handle the marketing for you, the traditional publishing route may be the best option.

Ultimately it is up to you to decide! For more information on all of your options, contact The Country Press.

lecanadian.com


The Difference Between Self-Publishing and Traditional Publishing? Newton, MA

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, February 05, 2014

In traditional publishing, the publisher handles the marketing, distribution, and warehousing for your book. This is the traditional method to book publishing because there is no expense to the author—mainstream publishers make a profit from the book's sales.

With self-publishing, depending on which type of publisher or platform you choose, the majority of the work falls on your shoulders and you pay for all expenses. The main advantages of self-publishing are that you control when the book is published, you retain all rights to your book, and you receive 100 percent of the profits.

In both cases, you have the option to choose what format your book will be published in—printed book, e-book, audio book, cd, dvd, and many more. If you pick an e-book, which is essentially a book published in digital form and available on e-Readers and other electronic devices, it can be downloaded instantly, has the ability to be translated into different languages, and can never go out of print. However, the e-book formats and file types develop and change over time, many may need to be converted to a new file or format.

For more information on self-publishing and the different ways of publishing your book, contact The Country Press.

Writers Digest Shop


Short Run Book Printing Or Bulk Book Printing? Newton, MA

Joseph Coupal - Friday, January 31, 2014

There are two innovative ways for self-publishes author to print a book: the POD or print-on demand, also called short run book printing; and there is traditional publishing, which prints books in bulk.

POD, or short run printing, allows you to print only the amount of books you want or need. You can publisher your book based on consumer demands, or on what you expect to be able to use and sell. Printing in bulk means that publishers will print books based on the given quantity they require to print in order to make money.

Short run books are more expensive per book. But cost less overall than published on printing in bulk because you can print anywhere from 11-5000. However, even though bulk books cost less per book, you end up owning more than 5000 books all at once. This means that the actual book printing costs more upfront and you may have storage issues.

Additionally, often publishers will not give royalties on printed books until those books are sold. With short run printing, as a new writer you can print what you need without a large upfront cost and without the hassle of storage.

Authors who choose to self-publish can use these short run books as advanced copies, as copies for reviewers, or for book fairs and signings. As sales or demand increase, they can return to the publisher for more books as needed, never printing more than they can handle or sell.

For more information on short run book printing, contact The Country Press.


Benefits of Print on Demand and Short Run Printing – Boston, MA

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, January 22, 2014

With the development of digital printing, short run printing is now an easy possibility. If you want to react to a market condition, you no longer have to rely on off-set printing for your printed book. On-demand printing can run 1 book at a time for you. Print shops are adding on-demand component to their operations to address the shorter run requirements of their customers and authors. Even large institutions like university presses and other academic publishers have also adopted this new digital printing technology.

In terms of cost, it has been found to be quite cheaper compared to the traditional offset printing for the short run. Since you are doing small run, adjusting the content is pretty easy to do through digital printing by simply changing the file and reprinting.

To further promote POD, waste is minimized. If there is a mistake on an off-set run, running new plates can be expensive. By printing only what you require, you are also saving the environment. You will not be throwing a large amount of printed materials in the dumpster when the original is changed or updated. It reduces to cost of waste and preserves the environment.

New opportunities abound with digital technology. For instance, individual authors who want to publish their own work can now have the ability to do it themselves. Short run book publishing is easy for any author that would like to produce a book or a business that wants to publish a book for their prospects and customers. In addition, the small print runs can always be published when needed.

The most important thing today is the on-demand book printing needs to be good. Digital brings with it the ability to do many creative things.

For more information on print on demand or short run printing, contact The Country Press.

News International


Self Publishing Became Huge in 2013

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Call 2013 the year of the self-published book, as hundreds of thousands marched to the drummer of their own words on their own terms — and the business world scrambled to catch up and capitalize on the trend.

2013 was a big year for self-publishers. On the heels of 50 Shades of Grey author, E.L. James, who initially self-published her trilogy, many other self-publishing authors have similar dreams of stardom.

According to the Star, self-publishing titles this year alone are in the hundreds of thousands. Compare that to the 20 to 30,000 books being published by traditional publishers a year. It far outstrips that.

With new technology and the addition of eBooks, self-publishing is becoming more and more popular.

Georgie Binks was feeling pretty excited about her first foray into book self-publishing. Then 500 of her books arrived in 23 boxes. She sold them within two months and thanks to short run book printing, ordered 250 more.

One publishing company says there are at least 250,000 titles from self-published authors on their company's site. A year ago, it would have been a quarter of that.

There have been past success stories of self-publishing, but they were rare. With new technology/software self-publishing has never been easier.

Kindle has even sold more than one million copies each of 14 self-published titles this year.

These times will be known as “the glory days of self-publishing.” There’s no financial barrier to publishing a book anymore.

For information on self-publishing, contact The Country Press.

Excerpts - The Star


PUBLISHERS

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Are you late with titles for the current season? Are you trying to make that upcoming book show? Do you need dependability? Where do you need your books shipped to? Look no further than Country Press.

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Country Press has a long history of supplying printed material to our nations Universities and Colleges. If any one or more of the following scenarios apply, we are the one to turn to.

SELF-PUBLISHERS

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Self-Publishing can be a virtual minefield if you are not careful. To make this an efficient process and successful endeavor you need to understand some of the “Basics” of Publishing and the definition of Self-Publishing.

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